Learning Log, Nov 2020

Took a break from my regularly scheduled side projects this month to:

  • Gab too much about pens
  • Build [most of] a blog for my fiber crafts (knitting, sewing, weaving) that I’m not sure I’ll actually use 🙃
  • Convert a couple lingering projects from Jekyll to Eleventy.

For the Eleventy migrations, I started with my bucketlist, which is super simple and has, like, one fork. Next I tackled my highlights—still a simple site but with a few more Jekyll-esque practices baked in to think about. For example, I had to do a little bit of extra work to continue supporting YAML data files.

To be honest, I felt a bit guilty switching out a core dependency in a project I’ve published in the open (namely, the highlights site). I don’t know that that’s the right feeling to have: the main purpose of my repo is to deploy highlights.melanie-richards.com. I released it without a license, which effectively implies default copyright expectations. That said, people have forked it and remixed it to stand up their own collection of highlights. And I think there are some expectations placed upon the maintainer of a public repo, regardless of promises you have or haven’t made.

In the end, I did what is right for me and my development practices; the main branch now takes a dependency on Eleventy. To support people who’d still like to use the Jekyll version, I packaged that up in a release and will keep a jekyll branch up that people can fork off of and contribute to. And I’ll need to think about what license would be appropriate for the repo to make it clearer I’m cool with people remixing. 🤔

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