Learning Log: August 2017

I’m always curious about others’ learning processes, so I thought I’d share my own, stream-of-consciousness style. I should mention here that everyone has different amounts of free time and their own preferences as to how they’d like to spend it. There is no “right way” to learn new things, this is just what it looks like for me.

A collage and vector line art illustration

My contribution for August’s Palette Party, a little project where some internet friends and I make a something based on a particular color palette. I started messing around with collage for this one and it just ended up in this creepy science-fictiony place.

Subject-matter notes I updated this month: accessibility, animation/motion

Week of July 30

Week of August 14

Week of August 21

Week of August 28

This is the week of reminders for truths that are occasionally challenging to internalize:

  1. The only thing you can’t improve upon is a blank page. Instead of continually deleting, restarting, rinse, repeat, just get something, anything down. It’ll save time in the long run, even if you end up scrapping most of it.
  2. This distinction Julie Zhuo mentions between a fixed and growth mindset. Buzzwords, but a worthy application:

I feel like I mention mindset pretty much every week, but I’ve found it to be completely transformative in my thinking. Really, go and read Mindset by Carol Dweck if you haven’t already. A fixed mindset presumes that what you are capable of today is how capable you really are, which means every time you get critical feedback, you read it as a judgement on your person. Hey, this thing you did isn’t great gets translated to I’m not great. A growth mindset presumes that no matter where you are now, you can improve. If you believe that, then whenever someone tells you, Hey, this thing you did isn’t great, you think, Okay, that feedback was useful and it’ll help me do better next time. With a growth mindset, you start to crave feedback from as many people as possible, even critical feedback, because you realize it’s the fastest way for you to learn and improve.

(via Kate Matsumoto’s article)