Pigments and poetry: Learning Log, February 2018

Stuff I’ve been thinking about or experimenting with over the past month.

  • Rethinking my relationship to “wasted” work: those tasks you spend a good chunk of time on, but the results go unused. It’s not a “waste” of time, it’s effort you had to put in to better see where you were going and what the best outcome should be. False starts = building up to something.
  • This Twitter thread on documentFragment goes to show that the perf gains of this approach, as with most things, depends on context.
  • Lemon seems like too bright a flavor to pair with chocolate, but I actually quite liked this bar by Theo.

Nice bits of internet

A grid of powder pigments from natural sourcecs

I’m such a sucker for found pigments; these are ochre pigments collected by Heidi Gustafson

  • Project Torino is a physical programming language for children with visual impairments. It seems there’s always some cool venture at my company that I hadn’t yet heard about (this one via Rob Whiting in the web-a11y Slack).
  • Frontend Case Studies
  • Discovered Kim Abeles’s smog plates through the Good Food podcast. Abeles puts a stencil on a dinner plate, leaves it out on the roof in LA, and lets smog sediment settle on the open spaces of the plate. She’s done these for the U.S. presidents, where she leaves a plate out for a longer or shorter time depending on the president’s environmental record (longer for subjectively worse records).
  • Jisho is a super useful Japanese <=> English dictionary that even shows the stroke order for various kanji.

Interesting reads

Some gloom and doom in the reads list this month, so to bolster you in these trying times:

If equal affection cannot be,
Let the more loving one be me.

—From “The More Loving One” by W. H. Auden (via Rosie L.)

Comments

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